Long-Term Freedom for Families


Long-Term Freedom for Families

Editor’s Note: We originally posted this simple, yet thoughtful post a year ago. Because it was so impactful, we decided to publish it again. This year, be sure you talk to your clients not just about their own independence, but the independence of their loved ones. 

 

On the Fourth of July, we all think about having a day off from work, eating at cookouts, watching fireworks and just enjoying ourselves. It seems as though we’ve quickly forgotten about what the day really means: Independence. 

Now I’m sure everyone reading this thinks I’m going to talk about your clients having the freedom and independence to receive long-term care where and how they want. To be honest, that’s the way I was going to go … Then I started thinking about my mother-in-law and all the struggles she and her siblings have gone through over the past few years as their parents required care … So please bear with me as I take a different approach.

 

Changing Roles

When it comes to long-term care, I’ve written many times about the consequences family members suffer when their love one chooses to ignore the need for planning. What I’m saying is this: When someone needs extended care, they get it. But, those closest to them get new obligations which they may not be ready for. They are no longer a spouse, child or grandchild – they are likely caregivers, and their loved one is their patient.  

While we all would happily sacrifice everything for our families (or at least I hope), would we ever ask our family members to do the same for us? The only logical answer is no, but clients seem to take this approach every single day. Ask them: 

“If you have an extended care event, would you ask your spouse, children, grandchildren or other loved ones to give up their lives – their independence – to be your caregivers?”

The answer is probably no, but we typically don’t make our clients look at it this way.

 

Put it in Practice

As we celebrate our great nation’s independence, let’s change the way we have the conversation about long-term care. Let’s talk to our clients about giving their families freedom – freedom to continue to live their lives and not put everything on hold. Just a few simple questions will help them see things in a different light.