Annuities

Why We Should Change Our Measurement of Success


Annuities

When it comes to retirement planning, our industry’s priorities need to change. If we continue to measure our success against the market, we’ll always come up short of expectations. 

Case in point: In March, the Wealth Adviser Daily Briefing from the Wall Street Journal analyzed the benchmark performance for the mutual fund industry in 2015. Some key takeaways:

  • Not surprisingly, most stock pickers and active managers (66%) did not beat their benchmark index
  • 84% of active large cap managers did not beat the S&P 500 over five years
  • 82% did not beat the benchmark over 10 years 

Obviously, there is a bias toward exchange-traded funds and index investing in today’s planning. However, I argue there is another benchmark that is more important – the client’s benchmark. 

Clients rarely have a financial goal of exceeding the 10-year average of the S&P 500 performance. Instead, they usually have in mind a dollar amount where retirement seems achievable. We are noticing that dollar amount goal is shifting from a focus on the asset value to a focus on the amount of income that will make their retirement successful. 

So, instead of publishing the performance of active managers against an external index, why don’t we identify how many of their investors earned more than required in order to have a successful retirement? These investors should be held to the same fiduciary standard as the financial planners who are meeting with clients, working to ensure their goals are met. In a post-DOL world, we need to look at our entire industry differently and challenge our thinking as it relates to our clients’ goals and objectives.  

Going forward, we must align our goals with those of our clients in order to impact a meaningful change in our industry. The most successful financial planner will be someone capable of articulating how his or her financial planning process exceeded each individual client’s benchmark return or income goal. 

Winning Strategy

Instead of looking at external indexes to validate our performance, let’s focus on reaching our clients’ goals first. Each client has a unique target they need to achieve in order to retire successfully – let’s validate our success through their success.

About the Author

Mike McGlothlin is the Executive Vice President of Annuities at Ash Brokerage. His strength is helping advisors become more efficient and effective in their businesses. He and his team provide income-planning solutions focused on longevity and tax efficiency, and they also assist advisors with entering defined-benefit termination planning and structured settlement markets.

Survive and Advance: The March Madness Mentality


Annuities

If you know me, you know March Madness is one of my favorite times of the year. I love that the regular season, conference championships, or even talent of the team doesn’t matter once the tournament begins. Rather, what truly counts is how effectively the teams use the “survive and advance” strategy to play the next six games.

With all of the recent changes in our industry due to the U.S. Department of Labor ruling, “survive and advance” certainly applies. Many industry experts continue to spew complaints, as the rulings’ requirements are undoubtedly burdensome and difficult to administer. But instead of stagnating under the pressure, we need to adapt the “survive and advance” mentality – most importantly, we need to advance.

To advance your business, you should adapt this mentality in three areas: 

  1. Fiduciary Standard – As a financial professional, you must consider how to survive in a fiduciary role. Although many of you have already reached this standard with parts of your business, adapting your entire client base to that level may be difficult, timely and costly. You’ll need to change your business model and learn to become more efficient. However, these issues should be corrected and improved – with or without government requirements – to enhance your business. With the right mentality, these changes will not only help you survive, but also lead you to thrive. 

  2. Technology – Think of ways you can incorporate technology to improve your everyday practices and remain at the forefront of advances as they come. The true key to any change as a result of the DOL rulings will be how we advance with technology – as an industry and as financial professionals. Our banking industry competitors are able to move funds with the click of a cellphone camera. Yet, we still require timely paper signatures to move assets between carriers. Our current technological status and distribution methods will not attract millennials to invest in our business. 

  3. Client Experience – In a fiduciary world, it’s ultimately the client experience, not the rule itself, that will determine who will be successful. If you can improve the client experience and attract new, high quality prospects, you will survive and advance. However, if you fail to step up your game, you will quickly fall behind.

 

Winning Strategy

Embrace the “survive and advance” mentality. Adapt to the specifics of the DOL ruling, but also think about advancing and thriving in your practice.

 

About the Author

Mike McGlothlin is the Executive Vice President of Annuities at Ash Brokerage. His strength is helping advisors become more efficient and effective in their businesses. He and his team provide income-planning solutions focused on longevity and tax efficiency, and they also assist advisors with entering defined-benefit termination planning and structured settlement markets. 

Our Digital Value Dilemma


Annuities

We’re not in the technology industry, but it’s clear technology is important to ALL industries, including financial services. As you evaluate your business model to meet new regulations, you should also consider how technology can make those changes more effective.  

Recently, I read an article published by CISCO about digitization and the Global Center for Digital Business Transformation’s 2015 study on digital disruption. Digitalization, according to the article, refers to upgrading an office by creating a website or investing in cutting-edge technologies. By evaluating your own digitalization, you ultimately will be able to improve your client experience, a key differentiator that can set you apart from competitors. Advisors and financial planning firms that master this idea will stand a step above the rest.

 

The Cost of Waiting

The risk of NOT thinking digitally may prove costly. The Global Center’s study predicts four of the top 10 industries will be replaced in the next three years due to “digital disruption” – when a technological advancement makes an industry nearly obsolete. For example, film cameras were replaced by digital cameras, and even digital cameras are now being replaced by smartphone cameras. 

Failing to be up to speed with the digital world will result in being passed by those who have the technological advances. Our clients are bombarded by digital advertising and notifications, so we must remain at the forefront of their minds in order to capture market share. Only through a process of effective digitalization will our business be able to successfully reach clients and remain competitive. 

Government regulation forces us to look at our business differently now, but technology can provide the tools we need to catapult our business to a higher level. As you evaluate changes to your practice, ask yourself: 

  • How can I become more technologically efficient as I market my services and products?  
  • More importantly, how can digitalization improve my client experience?  

 Both will help you increase your market share in the future. 

 

Winning Strategy

Rethink your business model and client experience in order to improve. Don’t allow new regulation to be the disruptor that solely shapes your business – use technology to make it more valuable to your clients and prospects.  

 

About the Author

Mike McGlothlin is the Executive Vice President of Annuities at Ash Brokerage. His strength is helping advisors become more efficient and effective in their businesses. He and his team provide income-planning solutions focused on longevity and tax efficiency, and they also assist advisors with entering defined-benefit termination planning and structured settlement markets.

 

 

technology

Racing Toward Our New Future


Annuities

In May, I attended the 100th running of the Indianapolis 500.  It was an amazing event. With 350,000 fans packed inside the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, Indianapolis became the 57th largest city in the United States that day. As I watched the race and walked around the speedway, I thought of all the history and tradition that makes up “The Greatest Spectacle in Racing.” 

Several aspects of the day stood out and made me think about how we conduct ourselves and run our business.

 

Respect

The Indy 500 always takes place on Memorial Day weekend, a holiday dedicated to honoring our veterans, especially those who gave their lives in service. In the race’s opening ceremonies, taps is played by a member of the military band. During the performance, you could hear a pin drop in the speedway – the atmosphere of respect was astounding.  

The trumpet player captured everyone’s attention and commanded their respect due to the meaning behind the ceremony. How do we gain that level of respect with our clients? Why can’t we develop a rapport that makes them want to intently listen to every word (note) and reflect on what we say? 

 

Courage

Due to the 100th running of the race, the speedway promoted the city of Indianapolis, which is only appropriate – it’s a great place to live and grow up. The Indianapolis Children’s Choir sang “God Bless America” and “America the Beautiful” before the race.  A 10-year-old soloist performed flawlessly and made the hairs on my arm stand up. What courage for a 10-year old to stand up and sing in front of 350,000 people, plus millions more on television! She had to stretch herself to attain the confidence needed to perform on that stage.

Think about how many hours that little girl practiced for her 3-minute performance. What did she do to become so focused that the distraction of thousands of people and cameras in her face didn’t faze her a bit? Don’t our clients deserve the same amount of focus and attention?

 

Strategy

Alexander Rossi won the Indianapolis 500 by driving across the finish line nearly on fumes. He strategized with his crew and made fewer pit stops by conserving fuel in the final laps. He painstakingly floored the gas and then coasted, holding the clutch in during the turns and short chutes. Then he ran out of fuel on his victory lap.  

How much time do you spend working on your business instead of in your business? Rossi’s crew knew how much mileage they would have throughout the race. Do you know how much revenue you are getting from each appointment, client or sales call? If not, you might find it more difficult to execute a new strategy as our business changes. 

 

Winning Strategy

Think about how you can build trust and respect with your clients, have the courage to stretch and change, and create strategies that will propel your business forward.  

 

About the Author

Mike McGlothlin is the Executive Vice President of Annuities at Ash Brokerage. His strength is helping advisors become more efficient and effective in their businesses. He and his team provide income-planning solutions focused on longevity and tax efficiency, and they also assist advisors with entering defined-benefit termination planning and structured settlement markets.

Perspective, Gratitude and Pride for our Work


Annuities

Perspective

While on a cruise, I got a painful, but much needed, bamboo massage. The therapist used hot oils to prepare my skin and muscles, then she proceeded to use a rolling pin-like bamboo instrument on me. It hurt, but it was the most beneficial and pain-relieving massage I’d ever experienced. 

As I checked out of the spa, I signed the bill, which included a modest tip. I decided to add an additional tip for the therapist, and she handed it back to me, pointing out that a gratuity had already been added. I said I saw the gratuity but added some extra for the great massage.  

She looked at me and questioned, “For me?” I nodded affirmatively, and she rigorously shook my hand. She went on to tell me that she had worked for the Royal family in Saudi Arabia until joining the spa franchise, and where her family lives now, one dollar will by five meals.  

That’s when perspective hit me squarely in the face. 

 

Gratitude

I felt grateful to even have the option of getting a massage from this woman. And, I felt grateful to live in an economy as robust as ours, to be in the financial position to go on a great vacation with friends, have nice dinners and never worry about where my next meal was coming from. 

As the day went on, I began to think about the value we bring to people as financial professionals. Much of our society isn’t that different from the massage therapist – a small increase in money can be very meaningful. While it’s not as extreme as her family’s situation, millions Americans face the challenge of living paycheck to paycheck. 

More importantly, millions of Americans are NOT planning for a retirement that might include health care needs, inflation and longevity risks. How quickly will our country look like this woman’s homeland where too many people aren’t able to enjoy the fruits of their labor?  

 

Pride

I take pride in our staff and the work we do for our clients. And, I’m grateful our profession can have such a positive impact on so many people in the United States. However, there is much more work to be done, challenges to face, and biases to eliminate.  

Our industry – for all its faults – remains one of the most prestigious in the country. But regulators will continue to attack us due to the actions of an extremely small percentage of institutions and their employees – no different from any other industry. No matter what, we can control how we react and help Americans in the future. 

Let’s keep what we do in perspective and take pride in helping our neighbors make meaningful change in their financial lives.

 

Winning Strategy

Throughout life, you gain perspective from people you meet. We should take pride in helping people reach financial goals, no matter how large or small. Take time to reflect on your business, and be grateful and proud of the work you are doing.   

 

About the Author

Mike McGlothlin is the Executive Vice President of Annuities at Ash Brokerage. His strength is helping advisors become more efficient and effective in their businesses. He and his team provide income-planning solutions focused on longevity and tax efficiency, and they also assist advisors with entering defined-benefit termination planning and structured settlement markets.